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Taranaki Stories

These stories capture the very essence of Taranaki – the people and the landscape.
They record the achievements of those who live here, the struggles of the first settlers, the determination to overcome challenges, those who have made their mark on not only their own, but also future generations.
But the stories are not just about hardship – they are also inspiring, thrilling, mystifying, enlightening and entertaining.
 
 

 

Taranaki Stories

Showing stories tagged as novelist.

The Scarecrow Committee

by Rhonda Bartle on 05 November 2009

Tim Chadwick's father grew up on South Road, Hawera, next to the Morrieson house and often told tales of the author arriving home at dawn, in his great lump of a car, so boozed up he would fall sleep at the wheel.   It only added to the curious shine of the man's reputation, and a glimpse of Ronald Hugh Morrieson's face at the attic window, would stay with Chadwick for all time.   But it...

Taranaki Gothic Horror

by Rhonda Bartle on 05 November 2009

Some say Morrieson's books are a mix of popular genres from Mark Twain to Ed McBain, while others see Erskine Caldwell and Raymond Chandler in the plots.   Even the author himself wasn't sure.  Of The Scarecrow he said, “It's a kind of thriller, I suppose, but I think it's also a work of art - at least I hope it is.”   The Scarecrow established his trademark style - a blend of boy's own...

A Penchant for Pranks and Beer

by Rhonda Bartle on 05 November 2009

Malcolm Robinson and Ronald Morrieson grew up pretty much joined at the hip.  Two parts of the Terrible Four along with Gerald Patterson and Len Flavell, Robinson describes his mate Morrieson as a chameleon, 'a total charmer'.   “We were an average group of 12 to 14 year-olds having tons of fun on our bicycles,” he says of their teenage years. “Morrieson's most valued possession was a Rudd...

A Bulky Man of Large Enthusiasms – Ronald Hugh Morrieson

by Rhonda Bartle on 05 November 2009

In small-town Hawera, he spent his nights drinking, gambling, womanising, playing jazz and generally raising hell in dance halls and pubs. Rumours abounded about the excesses in his life. Yet he lived and died in the very house where he was born and only ventured out of Taranaki on less than half a dozen occasions.    Too much for one small town Morrieson was born in 1922 and came to...